How to stop Apple Card notifications from bombarding you


Switch off those pesky Apple Card notifications
Photo: Ed Hardy/Cult of Mac

Are you enjoying your new Apple Card? Isn’t running up debt great when it is accompanied by a titanium card and a stylish app? But what you might not be enjoying are the Apple Card notifications that started to pop up on your iPhone.

Here’s how to stop them. But beware: It’s an all-or-nothing proposition that clearly illustrates an annoying problem with iPhone notifications.

Apple Card notifications: All or nothing

The Apple Card notification that’s most likely to annoy is the Daily Cash alert, which will show up every morning. Unfortunately, you can’t turn off just the Daily Cash notifications. You can only turn off your Apple Card notifications entirely. That would mean you wouldn’t get transaction notifications, which is a problem because these could alert you to a fraudulent use of your card.

If you decide to switch off everything, doing so is easy. Just open up the Wallet app, tap the More button and go down to Transactions.

Then, tap Allow Notifications to toggle notifications on or off. If you want to go nuclear and kill all Wallet notifications, you can do so in the Settings app under Notifications.

Clunky iOS notifications

It’s pretty annoying that Apple won’t let you switch off only the Daily Cash alerts. This is a nice example of the limits of iOS notifications in general. I have most of my notifications switched off, because too many apps take advantage of the all-or-nothing nature of the notification framework. You might have notifications enabled on an app to get legitimate alerts, but the app also sends you promotional junk on occasion.

Because you can’t fine-tune the iPhone notifications you receive, you must put up with the spam or turn everything off. I usually choose the latter — before searching for a replacement app. If developers think it’s OK to spam me, I’m not using their apps.

So, that’s how to switch off your Apple Card notifications. You’d think Apple would set a better example.



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